Elsevier

Chemosphere

Volume 234, November 2019, Pages 769-776
Chemosphere

Inoculation of plant growth promoting bacteria from hyperaccumulator facilitated non-host root development and provided promising agents for elevated phytoremediation efficiency

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Highlights

PGPB isolated from hyperaccumulator facilitated non-host plant root development and promoted plant growth.

Burkholdria SaMR10 and Sphingomonas SaMR12 were identified as the promising microbes for improving phytoremediation efficiency of Cd contaminated soils.

Abstract

Plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) have been reported to have the ability to promote plant growth, development and increase heavy metals (HMs) uptake. Therefore, PGPB inoculation as soil remediation agents into plants with larger biomass and potential of phytoextraction is of great importance to increase bioremediation efficiency. In this study, 12 PGPB strains isolated from a cadmium (Cd)/zinc hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance were inoculated into non-host plant Brassica juncea and their effects on plant growth and Cd uptake were determined. The results showed that inoculation of most PGPB strains promoted plant growth, boosted root development and improved chlorophyll content in the absence of Cd. Inoculation of PGPB strains promoted plant growth up to 111% in shoot and 358% in root when treated with 2 μM Cd. In addition, PGPB inoculation not only ameliorated plant root morphology including the total root length (RL), total surface area (SA), total root volume (RV) and number of root tips (RT), but also facilitated Cd uptake up to 126%. Furthermore, inoculation of PGPB strains promoted plant Cd accumulation up to 261% in shoot and up to 8.93-fold increase in root. Among all the 12 PGPB strains, Burkholdria SaMR10 and Sphingomonas SaMR12 were identified as the promising microbes for improving phytoremediation efficiency of Cd contaminated soils. These results not only provided useful findings for further investigation of interacting mechanisms between different bacterial strains and plants, but also facilitated the development of microbe-assisted phytoremediation application for HM contaminated soil.

Keywords

Endophyte
Sedum alfredii hance
Oilseed rape
Cadmium
Phytoremediation